Site Home

18xx Games
18xx Rules Difference List

Click for 18xx Home
You are in: Home > 18xx > 18xx Rules Difference List > Section 9

Red line

| Introduction | Contents | Games | Glossary | Previous page Next page |

9.4 - When a company is forced to buy a train and cannot buy one with its own means, what train may it then buy?

1800, 1829 Mainline, 1853, 1853 v2, 18EZ Level 1 A company does not have to own a train.
1812 A company must attempt to buy a train if possible, but if it cannot afford to do so, even by taking out loans, it does not have to do so.
1824 Any available train from the bank or offered by other companies. A clarification from Lonny Orgler states that the company can choose any of these trains - if the company has insufficient money for the chosen train, the Director can add the necessary funds.
1825, 1829 A company does not have to own a train. However, a company in receivership must buy a train as soon as funds permit unless there is no route on which it can run. While not stated, this is assumed to be from the bank.
1826 Any available train from the bank or bank pool, or starting in phase 6H, from another company at an agreed price not exceeding its face value. You may be compelled to take out a loan to assist with the purchase of a train from the bank.
1830
Avalon Hill rules: The cheapest train available in the bank, or a train from another company at an agreed price not exceeding its face value.
1830 Avalon Hill clarification: The cheapest train available in the bank.
1830 Francis Tresham: The cheapest train available in the bank, or a train from another company at an agreed price not exceeding its face value. The President of the selling company makes the deal simultaneously with any necessary share sales (this has been interpreted as meaning that the old and new President must both agree to the deal; and in other ways).
1830 Avalon Hill PC program: As in 1898.
[I am sorry if you find this tedious. I assure you, so do I.]
1830BC, 18VA The cheapest train available in the bank.
1831, 1854, 1862, 18EC, 18NL, 18Ruhr Any available train from the bank or bank pool, or from another company, at an agreed price not exceeding its face value.
1835 Any second-hand train (from the bank pool or another company) or the cheapest new train (only one type can be available at a time). This is what the German rules say. (One English translation says the cheapest train from the bank or bank pool.)
1837 You can buy any available train: you may pay any agreed amount for a train from another company; you may buy any train in the bank pool; you may buy any available new train (there is typically a choice of two).
1838 Rheinland Any second-hand train (from the bank pool or another company) or the cheapest new train (only one type can be available at a time).
1844, 18FL Any train from the bank; or any train from another company wishing to sell, at not more than face value.
1846 A currently available train from the bank. If it can afford one of current types but not the other, or can afford a second hand train, after issuing shares, the President may not add more cash to buy a more expensive train.
1848, 1862EA The next new train from the bank.
1851 The cheapest train from the bank or bank pool. The President of the selling company makes the deal after any necessary share sales.
1858 Any train from the bank or bank pool, not necessarily the cheapest. If the company has funds remaining after the purchase it can use these funds to buy any train from any source.
1860 Not applicable.  The company leases the smallest train from the new trains or the bank pool.
1861 Its choice of train from the bank or bank pool that it can afford with company credit plus any loans it is able to take out. This is a clarification from Markus Welborune/Mike Hutton.
1865 Sardinia, 18Dixie, 18MS, 18PA Any available train from the bank or the bank pool.
1873 There is no fund raising procedure to buy the mandatory train. COmpanies go bankrupt if they cannot buy the train with their own means, followed by receivership.
1880 Any train available from the bank, but not a restored 2 train.
1895 Any available train from the bank or bank pool, or from another company with the same president for at least 1.
1898 The cheapest train available in the bank, or a train from another company at an agreed price not exceeding its face value. The President of the selling company makes the deal before any necessary share sales.
18Ardennes The next train in the bank. The company may use Emergency Money Raising to buy a more expensive train from the bank even if it can afford a cheaper train that is available from the bank.
18EZ Levels 2 and 3 The cheapest train from the bank or the bank pool, or from another company for a price below the cheapest bank or bank pool train.
18MW The cheapest train available in the bank, or a train from another company with the same President at a price not exceeding face value.
18Neb Any currently available train in the bank, or a train from another company controlled by the same President. The company may use Emergency Money Raising to buy a more expensive train from the bank even if it can afford a cheaper train that is available from the bank.
18NY The cheapest train from the bank or bank pool if loans were used or the President contributed funds. If money was rised purely by selling treasury shares, then any train from the bank or bank pool.
1893, 18Rhl Rhineland The cheapest new train from the bank, or any train from the bank pool.
18Scan Any available train from the bank or bank pool, or from another company, at an agreed price not exceeding its face value. However, stock may not be sold to raise additional cash if buying a train from another company.
18US, 18West The next train available from the bank. If more than one type is available, the President may choose which one to buy, even if this then requires him to provide additional funds that would not be required for another available train.
2038 The cheapest spaceship type must be bought from the bank or bank pool. If the President is helping she can freely choose between a Scout and a Tug of the same type.
Crisis The company goes into 'receivership', a complex process.
Rolling Stock Not applicable.
Steam Over Holland The cheapest available train. The president does not have to accept an offer from another president to buy a train from that company.
Rest The cheapest train available in the bank or bank pool. Thus a company may be compelled to buy a used train.

| Introduction | Contents | Games | Glossary | Previous page Next page |

Red line

Mail me Keith Thomasson June 21st 2016